Our Day

We are pleased to present an exciting new initiative, called OUR DAY, to develop creativity, kindness and collaboration.

We are currently working with schools in Tameside, Greater Manchester – but could also come to your school, academy chain or local authority.

If you would like to know more then please get in touch. Thank you to Tameside Community Safety Team for supporting us. @tmbc_places @ace_national #ourday #artsawards

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Feedback is a gift! (especially the good kind)

We can deliver any of our courses online as well as in person. Here is some lovely feedback from our most recent Online Philosophy for Children Course: If you would like to run a course for your staff or a group teachers from different schools (which is easier online) please get in touch paula@permanenteducation.org

Thank you for the insightful sessions, all of the sessions have been beneficial, we are already making plans for September at ALC which is very exciting! Take care and have a lovely summer!

Really interesting with plenty of opportunities to discuss with yourself and the group xx

Thank you very very much Paula. A very useful and interesting course! Enjoy your Summer! xx

Thank you for everything, it’s been really interesting, I’m excited to try and use what I’ve learnt in my lessons. Thanks again!

Excellent course with lots of great ideas and opportunities to discuss philosophy and examples of how to do this with children, which has been very helpful. Use of Breakout Rooms was really well done and made me feel more confident to participate. Thank you!

Very enjoyable, interesting and informative! Looking forward to putting the ideas to work! Thank you!

Thank you very much for a really informative couple of sessions.

A really helpful session with plenty of practical strategies and examples. I have looked forward to logging on every week! Thank you 🙂

A selection of feedback from a group of primary and secondary teachers in Wales, June 2021

You’ve had the training – what next!

We all know that feeling – you’ve had some training – you’ve loved it – you believe in it – but Monday morning in your classroom – where to start?!

Practice Development Days are a vital part of what we do at Permanent Education. When we train a school we can also add on Practice Development Days, later in the school year, to help you embed philosophical teaching and learning into every aspect of your school life – or just to reassure you that you are on the right track! Here are some examples of the support we can offer:

  • Helping the P4C Lead with writing and implementing their action plan
  • Helping with how to incorporate 4Cs thinking (Caring, Creative, Collaborative and Critical) through out the curriculum, school ethos and policies.
  • Supporting the P4C Lead with observations and feedback to staff.
  • Helping the P4C Lead to plan and deliver top up staff meetings.
  • General moral support!

I feel motivated, supported and that I’ve had a really positive use of time. I now know how to move P4C forward in schools and I’m clear how to embed it within school. Thank you!

P4C Leader in Nottingham – after a support day with Rebecca, July 2021

Whether you have completed your P4C training last week or years ago you can book a support day with us by contacting us here paula@permanenteducation.org

Fantastic online P4C courses for teachers booking now for Autumn Term!

You can book a place on any of the forthcoming Dialogueworks open courses or arrange training at your school by emailing us here: paula@permanenteducation.org

P4C Plus Foundation – Two online courses to choose from (six 2 hour sessions) on:

  • 9/16/23rd September and 7/14/21st October: 13:00-15:00, or:
  • 4/11/18/25th November; 2/9th December: 15:30-17:30

£175 per person, or £250 for two people – email paula@permanenteducation.org


Thinking Moves A – Z Foundation – two online training courses to choose from (three 2 hour sessions) on:

  • 7/14/21st September: 15:30-17:30, or
  • 3/10/17th November: 15:30-17:30

£125 per person, or £200 for two people – email  paula@permanenteducation.org


P4C Plus Advanced – one online training course available (six 2-hour sessions) on:

  • 5/12/19th October and 2/9/16th November: 15:30-17:30

£250 per person, or £400 for two people – email  paula@permanenteducation.org


P4C Leadership Programme – one online training course available (three 2.5-hour sessions) on:

  • Wednesday October 13th 2021, Tuesday January 25th 2022, Thursday May 26th 2022: , 15:30 – 18:00: £300 per person or £500 for two people – email  paula@permanenteducation.org 

What a year!

Thank you to everyone who has supported us and worked with us this year. It has been fantastic to keep the P4C show on the road for some amazing schools and we look forward to an even better 2021!

There are still spaces available on our ONLINE Philosophy for Children open courses which we are running in January and June 2021 for @Sapere_P4C.

If you or a new member of staff needs to train in P4C then this is a great option! Book here https://permanenteducation.org/teacher-cpd/

For anything else: enquiry@permanenteducation.org or tweet @permanent_ed

Message us here

Hope you have a very happy and healthy Christmas!

Love from Rebecca and Paula

The Resilience Curriculum

How would you design a future curriculum? Here are our thoughts which were recently included in the Eton Journal for Innovation and Research in Education – by no means definitive but intended as a framework to start with – if you would like to talk further about our work in schools please contact us at enquiry@permanenteducation.org

EMBEDDING ENQUIRY AND THE PRINCIPLES OF PERMACULTURE IN THE CURRICULUM

When thinking about what education should look like post-COVID, it seems likely there will be a wide variety of vital interventions that need to be developed to help children catch up on academic gaps or missing skills following a long period of lockdown.

There are also many schools, local authorities and private organisations excellently promoting a ‘Recovery Curriculum’ designed to support children’s return to school, focused on their emotional and mental well-being following the wide range of losses they may have experienced during the lockdown (Carpenter, 2020). There are also, however, wide- ranging, fundamental discussions emerging about the role and shape of traditional education models in a post-COVID, climate-emergency society. These are important
discussions that certainly need to be addressed and this article proposes some possible curriculum solutions which could help to build a greater resilience for the future – for individuals, communities and society in general.

Before ‘normal’ teaching and learning can take place again, schools will definitely need to consider children’s immediate emotional and mental well-being. In addition to the different types of loss outlined by Carpenter (2020), in the recovery curriculum, experienced by children during the lockdown, early data shows that it also created a complicated situation where the measures taken to protect physical health have caused the symptoms for people suffering from poor mental health, including children, to worsen during lockdown (Veer et al., 2020).

Some children will have experienced a very stable home life during lockdown, but for others life will have become less stable or chaotic. It is acknowledged by the EEF in its Guide to supporting school planning: A tiered approach to 2020-21 that identifying where children may have dropped behind is important but so is a recognition that children may have acquired new useful knowledge, skills and experiences as part of the lockdown which needs to be heard (EEF, 2020). All children’s experiences and views on the lockdown period will be unique. During the pandemic we have all been part of the same storm, but each of us is in an individual boat, with our own story of survival, adaptation, transformation, loss or inertia.

Therefore, we believe that there also needs to be a recognition that the current focus on acquisition and reproduction of knowledge and the narrow ‘teaching to the test’ curricula is no longer enough for our society to be resilient. We believe that long term resilience for individuals and society should incorporate the integration of philosophical and ethical thinking throughout core curricula, and in particular the four types of thinking – Critical, Caring, Creative and Collaborative – central to the Philosophy for Children (Lipman, 2003) and Communities of Philosophical Inquiry (‘CoPI’) pedagogical approaches (McCall, 2009).

Philosophical enquiry and facilitation strengthen teaching, learning and assessment and have been proven to increase children’s cognitive levels, particularly in maths and reading, as well as many other wider abilities – primarily, children’s ability to solve problems, collaborate with each other, think critically and care about the quality of their interactions and relationships with others. For example, The 2015 EEF Efficacy trial (EEF, 2015) of Philosophy for Children, carried out by Durham University, showed that pupils made between two and four additional months of progress in reading, maths and writing as well as improvements in their confidence to speak, listening skills and self-esteem following their regular involvement with philosophical enquiry.

Philosophical teaching and learning is a pedagogical approach and not an ‘added extra’, as developing a critical and enquiring mind should be central across subjects. It can also usefully support the work of the education sector to meet the Ofsted (2019) requirements for schools to enable children to become ‘responsible, respectful and active citizens’ who have more skills to shape their lives in a sustainable and fulfilling way, as well as ‘developing pupils’ confidence, resilience and knowledge so that they can keep themselves mentally healthy’.

Philosophical thinking puts pupils’ personal development at its heart and has the potential to take children to a level of understanding where knowledge and facts are combined with the ability to reflect and reason, which can help enable children to ‘make a significant difference to the kind of society in which we are able to live’ (Cam, 2006).

When school leaders actively integrate communities of philosophical enquiry into their teaching, learning and assessment strategies they enable young people to develop the skills, knowledge and character necessary to achieve academically in the short term, and in the longer term to lead happy, resilient and fulfilling lives, taking greater care of themselves, society, communities and the planet.

Building on this, we would like to suggest that long-term individual resilience is only really possible if measures are taken to ensure that our communities are also more resilient. The recent call for volunteers by the government during lockdown followed by the overwhelming oversubscription of volunteers showed that there is huge potential within communities to take greater care of their own people. Schools could build on this potential by creating opportunities within the curriculum for children to know how to build positive, resilient relationships and help others in times of need.

The next step on from creating stronger local communities, and could be argued as the most significant issue of our time for which we need creative, critical, caring and collaborative thinkers, is the need to re-examine the relationship humans have with the planet and its resources.

The climate emergency will only be tackled through whole systems thinking instead of solely relying on one-off initiatives. We believe that the principles and ethics of permaculture would allow schools to weave creative, critical, caring and collaborative thinking into real actions that will tangibly improve the futures of our pupils, their communities and the planet.

The twelve principles and three ethics of permaculture, developed by Bill Mollison (1988) and David Holmgren (2011), are below and although their roots are in sustainable agriculture, they can be applied to all aspects of human life and can be applied by school leaders to have a lasting positive impact on well-being and resilience for individuals and the whole school ethos.

The Principles of Permaculture

  1. Observe & Interact
  2. Catch & Store Energy
  3. Obtain A Yield
  4. Apply Self-regulation and Accept Feedback
  5. Use & Value Renewable Resources & Services
  6. Produce No Waste
  7. Design From Patterns To Details
  8. Integrate Rather Than Segregate
  9. Use Small & Slow Solutions
  10. Use & Value Diversity
  11. Use Edges & Value The Marginal
  12. Creatively Use & Respond to Change

The Three Ethics of Permaculture

  1. Care for the Earth
  2. Care for Others
  3. Only take a Fair Share

By adopting and applying the principles and ethics rooted within philosophy for children and permaculture we can make the transition from being dependent consumers, vulnerable to change, to becoming responsible producers and resilient, active citizens with high-level thinking skills.

There is a virtuous cycle to be achieved here, where this approach, based around a greater sense of community and sustainability, has the potential to transform pupils’ well-being, building the resilience necessary for them to move forwards, promoting as they do their deeper understanding of sustainability and its relevance to all of our futures.

Instead of tinkering around the edges with curricula in a post-COVID age, we support Berry and Orr (2001, p 9). Berry speaks of ‘The Great Work’, where humans remake their presence on earth – including how they provide themselves with food, energy, materials, water, livelihood, health and shelter. Orr adds that ‘we must build authentic and vibrant communities that sustain us ecologically and spiritually and for this challenge we need a generation equipped to respond with energy, moral stamina, enthusiasm and ecological competence’.

In conclusion, we believe that this is the moment for educators to assert their experience and understanding of young people to create the curricula and ethos which they believe will genuinely allow their pupils and teachers to develop as resilient and active citizens where academic performance and emotional well-being are in balance. We urge and strongly support school leaders who take this opportunity to re-invigorate education’s potent and positive role in building societal and individual resilience, instead of simply returning to a system that is disproportionately focused on testing and the symbolic capital of results. A new resilience curriculum developed and delivered within strong communities of enquiry is now necessary. This is one that focuses on developing individual well-being and agency through dialogue and critical thinking, as well as strengthening the sustainability of communities through collaboration and care for each other and the planet.

Paula Moses and Rebecca Gough, Permanent Education
enquiry@permanenteducation.org or www.permanenteducation.org

References

Did you know that we specialise in Philosophical Enquiry in Alternative Provision? Find out more here.

Why Philosophical Enquiry?

Put simply, philosophical enquiry helps children and teachers learn and teach more effectively. 

The Philosophy for Children (P4C) pedagogy, devised by Prof. Matthew Lipman, uses philosophical enquiry and facilitation to strengthen teaching, learning and assessment and has been proven to increase children’s cognitive levels, particularly in maths and reading, as well as many other wider abilities – significantly, problem solving, collaborating with each other, thinking critically and caring about the quality of our interactions and relationships with others. 

The 2015 EEF Efficacy trial carried out by Durham University showed that pupils made between 2-4 months progress in reading, maths and writing as well as pupils confidence to speak, listening skills and self-esteem.  People working in Alternative Provision know that when all these factors are working then a child’s emotional well-being is strengthened which is essential for any child to make the progress relevant to them.

P4C and Alternative Provision

Rebecca Gough, Permanent Education Director and our lead AP trainer, has extensive experience working with a number of Alternative settings: Behavioural Units, Hospital Schools and SEN Schools to incorporate P4C into their curriculum and whole school ethos. She explains that, 

‘In an AP setting the mainstream P4C structures do not apply – every school I work with is different so it is vital that every support package is different. I am extremely flexible and make sure that I am led by the school who ultimately knows the children best.’

Reasonable children

Current work by Rebecca with a Hospital school in London has been to support children who need to ask soul searching questions about their illness or prognosis. Philosophical enquiry techniques and activities have helped them come to terms with their thoughts, and future plans and to understand how to reason with aspects of life and death which are out of our control.

In another school, a Pupil Referral Unit (PRU), a lot of our work recently has been to help the young people enquire and question the concepts of community and belonging. Many children who have grown up in unstable settings or gang communities need the chance to learn how to accept views other than their own and resolve problems without the use of violence or extremism. Philosophical enquiry is the way to do this work!’

Putting children at the centre of their learning and their futures

Don’t just take our word for it!

I first became aware of P4C about 18 months ago when I attended a training course where Rebecca had a workshop slot. It was incredibly inspiring and reminded me of exactly why I got into teaching in the first place. It was also clear that the P4C principles mapped perfectly onto our values as a Nurture school and I could see huge potential within our setting. Our vision is to become a Thinking Skills school just as much as we are a Nurture school – indeed the two approaches are inextricably interlinked. The thing that resonates with me most when it comes to P4C is this idea of “reasonableness”. That is such an invaluable life skill and it is something that many of our learners and their families struggle with. It leads to increased isolation, conflict, anxiety  and erects huge barriers to learning. If we can develop our young people’s ability to be reasonable members of their communities their lives will be infinitely more positive and productive.

Kate Emptage, Pathway Leader, Southgate School

‘The impact of philosophical questioning at our hospital school has been immense. The impact on our children and their ability to learn is life changing. For example, one of our pupils is a Year Four boy with both physical and mental health needs whose parent had allowed him to drop out of education and was insisting that there was a significant learning need. During a three week admission we were able to use socratic questioning and philosophical facilitation techniques, taught to us by Rebecca, which transformed this child’s self esteem and engagement with education. When I met them some months later in clinic, the child was happily back in school with a desire to learn’

Anne Patrick, Hospital School Team Leader

If you work in Alternative Provision then

let’s work together!

Rebecca will work with you to develop a model that is right for you. She will work directly with your teachers and leadership team so they can incorporate philosophical enquiry and high level facilitation into their existing practice. This model allows schools to have the skills, experience and ownership to continue and benefit from P4C without long term external support. This package can take the form of inset training courses, staff meetings, individual mentoring, co-teaching, observation, joint lesson planning and curriculum development.

IMPORTANTLY AT THIS TIME WE ARE ABLE TO PUT TOGETHER A SUPPORT PACKAGE DELIVERED COMPLETELY ONLINE UNTIL YOU ARE IN A POSITION TO OPEN YOUR SCHOOL TO VISITORS.

Contact us here: enquiry@permanenteducation.org

Calling all thinking teachers!

Get ahead and have fun by joining our online A-Z Thinking Moves training on 5th October 2020. *Discounts available for student teachers*

 ~ @PERMANENT_ED 

There are places available on our October online A-Z Thinking Moves (Metacognition) training course, accredited by Dialogueworks. This course is excellent for teachers, school leaders and youth group leaders – plus we are offering significant discounts for student teachers who attend the October training.

Why Thinking Moves?

 

Our thinking ability is what makes us distinctively human.  Yet we have no generally accepted approach to teaching thinking – and no common vocabulary to describe different ways of thinking.  This, when you think about it, is extraordinary.  Imagine trying to teach or learn maths if we did not have commonly accepted terms such as add, subtract, multiply and divide.

Thinking Moves A – Z  provides a vocabulary for thinking.  The moves themselves are not new – we all use them in our learning and our life every day.  But now we have a way of talking about how we think, and that gives us a means to work on improving the effectiveness of our thinking. 

The details:

Each place costs only £125 per person and includes:

  • 6 hrs online training plus webinars and a PDF copy of the A-Z Thinking Moves book.
  • Access to the premium resources from Dialogueworks – a comprehensive bank of lesson plans, assembly plans,
  • Online support from Paula and Rebecca at Permanent Education once you go back to school.

The next course is:

3.30-5.30 pm – 5th, 7th and 12th October – To secure your place contact us at enquiry@permanenteducation.org or call 07914 853919

Metacognition made simple

Research by the Education Endowment Foundation has shown that effective strategies for metacognition and self-regulation have consistently high levels of impact and can be particularly effective for low achieving and disadvantaged pupils. This Thinking Moves A – Z course supports every step of the EEF’s recommended framework for metacognition and self-regulated learning.

Calling all thinking teachers! Get ahead and have fun by joining our online A-Z Thinking Moves training on 6th July. *Discounts available for student teachers*

There are a few places available on our July online A-Z Thinking Moves (Metacognition) training course, accredited by Dialogueworks. This course is excellent for teachers, school leaders and youth group leaders – plus we are offering significant discounts for student teachers who attend the July training.

Why Thinking Moves?

 Our thinking ability is what makes us distinctively human.  Yet we have no generally accepted approach to teaching thinking – and no common vocabulary to describe different ways of thinking.  This, when you think about it, is extraordinary.  Imagine trying to teach or learn maths if we did not have commonly accepted terms such as add, subtract, multiply and divide.

Thinking Moves A – Z  provides a vocabulary for thinking.  The moves themselves are not new – we all use them in our learning and our life every day.  But now we have a way of talking about how we think, and that gives us a means to work on improving the effectiveness of our thinking. 

The details:

Each place costs only £125 per person and includes:

  • 6 hrs online training plus webinars and a PDF copy of the A-Z Thinking Moves book.
  • Access to the premium resources from Dialogueworks – a comprehensive bank of lesson plans, assembly plans,
  • Online support from Paula and Rebecca at Permanent Education once you go back to school.

The next course is:

3.30-5.30 pm – 6th, 8th and 13th July – To secure your place contact us at enquiry@permanenteducation.org or call 07914 853919

Metacognition made simple

Research by the Education Endowment Foundation has shown that effective strategies for metacognition and self-regulation have consistently high levels of impact and can be particularly effective for low achieving and disadvantaged pupils. This Thinking Moves A – Z course supports every step of the EEF’s recommended framework for metacognition and self-regulated learning.